HELP AND SUPPORT

Which wood should I use ? 

There are a myriad of wood types to choose from, all of which have their own burning qualities and properties and although there are references to burning green wood in this guide, we would stress that for the most efficient and effective burn in your wood burning stove only very dry wood should be used. This is a personal guide, and by no means comprehensive.
In addition there are of course the compressed reclaimed ‘eco’ type of logs and briquettes. These tend to burn well and for a decent length of time because they are dense and very dry, however try to choose a product that does not break apart too easily.
Alder
Produces poor heat output and it does not last well.
Poor
Apple
A very good wood that bums slow and steady when dry, it has small flame size, and does not produce sparking or spitting.
Good
Ash
Reckoned by many to be one of best woods for burning, it produces a steady flame and good heat output. It can be burnt when green but like all woods, it burns best when dry.  
Very good
Beech
Burns very much like ash, but does not burn well when green.
Very good
Birch
Produces good heat output but it does burn quickly. It can be burnt unseasoned, however the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use.
Good
Cedar
Is a good burning wood that produces a consistent and long heat output. It burns with a small flame, but does tend to crackle and spit and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use.
Good
Cherry
Is a slow to burn wood that produces a good heat output. Cherry needs to be seasoned well.
Good
Chestnut
A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output.
Poor
Firs (Douglas etc)
A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use.
Poor
Elm
Is a wood that can follow several burn patterns because of high moisture content, it should be dried for two years for best results. Elm is slow to get going and it may be necessary to use a better burning wood to start it off. Splitting of logs should be done early.
Medium
Eucalyptus
Is a fast burning wood. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire if burned unseasoned.
Poor
Hawthorn
  Is a good traditional firewood that has a slow burn with good heat output.
Very good
Hazel
Is a good but fast burning wood and produces best results when allowed to season.
Good
Holly
Is a fast burning wood that produces good flame but poor heat output. Holly will burn green, but best dried for a minimum of a year.
Poor
Hornbeam
A good burning wood that burns similar to beech, slow burn with a good heat output.  
Good
Horse Chestnut
A good wood for burning in wood stoves but not for open fires as it does tend to spit a lot. It does however produce a good flame and heat output.
Good (For stoves only)
Laburnum
A very smokey wood with a poor burn.
Poor do not use
Larch
Produces a reasonable heat output, but it needs to be well seasoned. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. 
Medium
Laurel
Burns with a good flame but only reasonable heat output. It needs to be well seasoned.  
Medium
Lilac
Its smaller branches are good to use as kindling, the wood itself burns well with a good flame. 
Good
Maple
  Is a good burning wood that produces good flame and heat output.
Good
Oak
Because of its density, oak produces a small flame and very slow burn, it is best when seasoned for a minimum of two years as it is a wood that requires time to season well.
Good
Pear
Burns well with good heat output, however it does need to be seasoned well. 
Good
Pine
(Including Leylandii) Burns with a good flame, but the resin sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire must be well seasoned.
Good (with caution)
Plum
A good burning wood that produces good heat output.
Good
Poplar
A very smokey wood with a poor burn.
Very poor
Rowan
  Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output.
Very good
Robinia (Acacia)
Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. It does produce an acrid and dense smoke but this is of course not a problem in a stove.
Good (For Stoves only)
Spruce
Produces a poor heat output and it does not last well. 
Poor
Sycamore
Produces a good flame, but with only moderate heat output. Should only be used well-seasoned.
Medium
Sweet Chestnut
The wood burns ok when well-seasoned but it does tend to spit a lot. This is of course not a problem in a stove.
Medium (For Stoves only)
Thorn
Is one of the best woods for burning. It produces a steady flame and very good heat output, and produces very little smoke.
Very good
Willow
A poor fire wood that does not burn well even when seasoned.
Poor
Yew
  A good burning wood as it has a slow burn, and produces a very good heat output.
Very good

Woodburning and multi-fuel stoves

1. With any new appliance there is a burning in period, this allows the paints to cure and any compounds used a chance to dry gradually. Please follow the manufacturer’s advice on starting a fire. The curing process of the paint can give off an odour and should be done with the windows open, this will prevent any irritation to your selves.

2. It is essential that the correct fuels are burnt on your appliance. Please avoid wet, painted and treated wood as this has an adverse effect on the performance and the life of the chimney and appliance. Misuse of fuels will jeopardise your warranty.

3. All chimneys must be swept and maintained on a regular basis by an approved chimney sweep. It is recommended that you have it swept once a year for coal and twice a year for wood or take advise from your chimney sweep. Please contact us if you wish us to provide this service for you.

4. A certificate is required from your chimney sweep as this demonstrates you have maintained your chimney as per the manufacturer’s instructions, without this certificate you could jeopardise your warranty.

5. Please ensure you register your warranty with the manufacturer, failure to do so could also jeopardise your warranty.

6. Fire rope seals, door glass and fire bricks are genuinely not covered by manufactures warranty. Some manufacturer’s do not cover grates and throat plates, others may vary.

7. Please ensure that CO detectors are frequently tested at least once a month and are located in the correct position.

8. It is not uncommon for fire cement on the flue pipe joints to crack and fall out. It is recommended you keep a small pot of fire cement to hand so these joints can be maintained as and when required.

Gas Fires and Stoves

1. With any new appliance there is a burning in period, this allows the paints to cure and any compounds used a chance to dry gradually. Please follow the manufacturers advice on using your fire. The curing process of the paint can give off an odour and should be done with the windows open, this will prevent any irritation to your selves.

2. Please ensure that the warranty is registered with the manufacturer, failure to do so could jeopardise your warranty.

3. It is recommended to get your appliance serviced at least once a year by a registered gas engineer, in order for warranty to be valid. Please contact us if you wish us to provide this service for you.

4. Ensure that you receive a certificate from your gas engineer, which would be required in an event of a warranty claim.

5. The glass, ceramics and coals are not covered by warranty.

6. If you have slide control or remote control and it stops working or omits a continuous beeping sound please change all the batteries first. This includes the hand set battery and the batteries inside the receiver which you will find behind the fret inside the appliance.

Fireplaces

1. There are various solutions to protect limestone, marble and slate. Caution should be taken when doing so, as this can change the appearance of your fireplace in some cases.

2. If installed with an appliance please wait 48 hours before lighting, this will give the compounds used time to dry naturally.

The above information is for guideline purposes only, if in doubt please do not hesitate to contact us or refer to your user’s manual provided with the appliance. 
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